carabiner

Not sure what to do with old gear? Here are some suggestions!

Not sure what to do with old gear? Here are some suggestions!

Buying climbing gear is not normally a casual ordeal. There's a reason stores like REI don't have a drive-through — there is a lot of time, and especially $$money$$ that goes into getting gear, so climbers will definitely use their acquired gear to an inch of its expiration date. But when that old gear eventually does wear out, disposing of it feels like just casually throwing $20s into the garbage disposal. But old, worn climbing gear is not safe, so there's gotta be a way to retire old gear that doesn't put you in mortal danger or consist of just throwing it in a Dumpster, right?

Thank God They Invented It So We Now Don't Have To: the briefest of histories on the death-defying origins of today's commonly-used climbing gear

As I illustrated in my previous post on the history of many climbing terms, climbing's past isn't the neat, sensible topic you'd read in a history book. Our ancestors were a nutty bunch, inventing words and gear on the fly, with little thought as to how much they were affecting the future of climbing, they were so into the now. Without these brave, often impulsive souls making the sport into what they wanted, we would not have many of the gear and phrases we readily have access to today.

Yeah, Did You Just Make That Up? I Think Ya Did — 20 climbing terms and their potentially nonsense origins

Climbers have a very particular vocabulary. If any outsider were to eavesdrop on a conversation between climbers for even five minutes, they would leave very confused and probably disgusted. Our slang terms get slangier, and shortened, and misspelled until we're left with a language so exclusive, that I'm still learning new words all the time — and I have been in the climbing game for about 13 years now. I compiled a list of 20 of the most common climbing terms that y'all might be interested in hearing the origins of. Let me know if I missed any! GriGri: Believe it or not, the term "GriGri" is derived from Voodoo. Yep, spell castin', doll stabbin' Voodoo.  In Voodoo, a "gris gris" is a good luck talisman —  thanks to its auto-locking feature, I'd say the GriGri is a pretty good luck charm against your partner's crappy belaying. So be sure to make an animal sacrifice to the Petzl gods, in appreciation for them creating you such a glorious device.