CAN YOU EVEN VOLUME?! Check out some of our routesetters' shenanigans on 360 Holds USA volumes!

CAN YOU EVEN VOLUME?! Check out some of our routesetters' shenanigans on 360 Holds USA volumes!

In case you need a reminder how stupid strong our routesetters are (as well as how awesome 360 volumes are), then watch this little shorty vid on some pretty ridiculous rock climbing by routesetters Canon Huse and Liam Shea. Shout out to 360 Holds USA for letting us misuse their volumes ... unless the volumes were intended to have rouesetters hide in them?!

Meet Your Manager: Elly Dannenfelser, new GM of Summit Denton

Meet Your Manager: Elly Dannenfelser, new GM of Summit Denton

Now that Summit Fort Worth is well on its way to being built, we're very pleased to announce that Adam Hughes, current GM of Summit Denton will be moving to Funkytown to be the new gym's GM. Soooooo that means that we need to leave Summit Denton in capable hands. Meet Elly Dannenfelser, new GM of Summit Denton! She's moving up from an assistant manager at Summit Carrollton to now General Manager of Summit Lil D! So here's a little more on the fresh face you'll be seeing up in Denton!

SBS Season Opener: That's a wrap! Here are photos and results from the comp at Summit Dallas

SBS Season Opener: That's a wrap! Here are photos and results from the comp at Summit Dallas

We opened the 2017 Summit Bouldering Series in style this past Friday at Summit Dallas! It was a packed house filled with some familiar faces, as well as a lot of new ones! Every single one of y'all crushed — even if the hardest thing you sent that day was hot dog #7, we're still so proud of you. Wanna see how you stacked up? 

To Hell and Back - a recap from 24 Hours of Horseshoe Hell!

To Hell and Back - a recap from 24 Hours of Horseshoe Hell!

It was so incredible to see SO MANY Summit members at Horseshoe Canyon Ranch this past weekend for 24 Hours of Horseshoe Hell! It felt like everywhere we looked, there was a Summit shirt. Summit owners Kyle Clinkscales and Chris LoCrasto competed, as well as gym GMs David Michener and Bryan Prater, Team Texas coach Dylan Honeyman and Media and Events Coordinator Caillin Murray, and yoga instructor Ashley Gardner (with many more employees in attendance). Our awesome resident photographer Jimmy Pancakes took a lot of great shots, so come live vicariously through them, or get PTSD if you were there this weekend!

A NIGHT TO REMEMBER: Memories from Summit Prom Night 2017!

A NIGHT TO REMEMBER: Memories from Summit Prom Night 2017!

Thanks to everyone who came out to Summit Prom 2017 and made it ABSOLUTELY MAGICAL. Y'all came, y'all danced, made it weird, and drained the punch bowl. We were so impressed by the amount of people that came dressed to the nines. And there were a lot of dudes in dresses.

Like, a lot. 

12 Hours of Summit Suffering 2017 - Photos, results and recap!

12 Hours of Summit Suffering 2017 - Photos, results and recap!

Another 12 Hours of Summit Suffering in the books! Thanks to everyone who came out - whether you competed or spectated, Y'ALL ARE AWESOME. Here's a quick recap of this year's 12 Hours of Summit Suffering.

24 Karat Gym - In Defense of the Gym Climber

24 Karat Gym - In Defense of the Gym Climber

It’s my experience that for some climbers, gym climbing lacks a sort of purity that every experienced rock-rat has an opinion on. The most common reason I hear is, “It’s not real climbing,” or “Gym climbing should only be a tool for training.” I understand the sentiment, and it isn’t without that sentiment that climbers can discuss what real or pure climbing is. Or, discuss what is or is not ethical, or best for the progression of the sport in the outdoors or at your local gym.

THE PSYCH IS HIGH — Here's a list of all the cool stuff entry into the 12HSS will get you!

THE PSYCH IS HIGH — Here's a list of all the cool stuff entry into the 12HSS will get you!

We're just over two weeks out from the 12 Hours of Summit Suffering competition! The stoke is so high - for those that have signed up already, here are some of the perks of you'll get from competing:

The good, the bad, and the epic - what are some of your climbing misadventures?

A guest post by contributing author Hamilton White

Climbing trips always come with some kind of bad news.  Usually it’s rain or you and your buddies forgot peanut butter. Hopefully it’s a story you'd want to tell others and laugh about, like the time I first climbed the Spider Grind at Reimer’s Ranch, and learned halfway through the route why it’s called Spider Grind. That's why for the last several weeks I bounced back and forth between members of the Summit climbing community for the sake of gathering stories to share with you all. I heard about pizza parlor basements, a climbing trip for the temporarily deaf that, for reasons not related to hearing resulted in sleeping in the team van, and my own first outdoor climbing trip to Barton Creek in Austin.

In the fresh 2017 winter, a trip to RRG without checking the forecast was all but asking for a discouraging experience. Snow and sub 20 degrees fahrenheit easily pushed one Summit climber and his partner out of their tent, and into the toasty basement of the known resting and food spot, Miguel's Pizza. Games and space heaters make it fairly understandable to opt out of sleeping in a six-person tent just the two of them, even though they brought enough insulation for a house. Plus, there was the added benefit of kickin’ it with a teacher who lives out of his van when school isn't in session. And when night rolls around, maybe the question, "Would anyone notice or care if we slept here?" is a good question to ask. But it's good they still left some cash in that lock box for the owner after drinking so much of the Ale81 piled up in crates, and for sleeping in the basement, of course.

Anyone who knows this climber as I do experienced my personal favorite part about this story. A few days into their trip, the climber-in-question's mother made a Facebook post asking if anyone had seen her child. Apparently, the two climbers had initially planned to climb in Red Rock State Park Arizona, but on closer look there was a “virtually one-hundred percent chance of rain for the whole week.” So, in place of Red Rock, the two decided to travel nine-hundred and sixty-eight miles in the other direction to Red River Gorge, without informing their parents. I was fortunate enough to have seen the initial post, and the aftermath of her search (eventually they connected over the phone) all in one sitting. So, I got all the entertainment, and none of the worry. I'm told Mom was pissed.

My own favorite story to tell is the time I took my first outdoor climbing trip as a sophomore in college (I'm a super senior now). About halfway through the drive to ATX, in a Taco Bell parking lot, everyone got into the bed of the truck to grab wallets out of packs when one of our (there were four of us) friends frantically started to sift through his bag as realization sunk in. "Oh no, I forgot all my gear. We have to go back!" Of course, we weren't going to do that at 4:00pm on the first day of spring break, traveling on I-35. We actually wanted to get where we were going. We looked around the bed of the truck and finally someone said, "Dude, you forgot your gear but remembered your guitar?" He was understandably upset, and I certainly didn't help by chronicling his distress on Facebook. Which, he explicitly asked that I not do, although I lost sympathy for his request once he wore my new Anasazi's without socks, my one condition for him borrowing them. A perpetual sogginess followed those shoes.

Our next story is from Mia Alfonso, a climber at the Denton location and student at the University of North Texas. Initially when I heard Mia’s story in blurb form, I thought, “Oh, you just got some soggy hamburgers, that’s like forgetting peanut butter. No biggie.”  But it turns out there was more, starting with the fact that the Team Natural kids -who climb down in Houston- like to play a game during travel when one person wears noise cancelling headphones and that person has to guess the word that everyone is trying to say. They chose to say phrases like, “fat chickens,” which is cool, I guess.  I’d pick supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, because why wouldn’t you?

The trip started out fine, according to Mia. The weather was  slightly cloudy, but nothing had indicated the need to turn around and go home. Not even the absent rainfly that she and her tent mates were going to sorely miss come 1:00am. And what an experience it must have been; sleeping in a van with five other people for the remainder of the trip.

What’s your funny and altogether-at-once unfortunate climbing story? Did you flex out on the starting hold? That crag puppy turn you into a hang-dog on a 5.5? Share with me!

Carrollton member party extravaganza bonanza: a recap

Carrollton member party extravaganza bonanza: a recap

Thanks to Jimmy Paenkhay for taking these shots and thanks to everyone who came out! We had over 160 tee shirts tie-dyed, floated 4 kegs of beer, threw 375 water balloons, did probably 45 cool tricks on the slip n slide, and went through like, 70 pounds of hamburger meat. If you have any photos of your own from the event, feel free to upload them to Instagram and tag us @summitclimbingyogafitness or hashtag #summitclimbingyogafitness! Or, ya know, good ol' Facebook works too.

Alternative facts - 15 common climbing terms and what they REALLY mean

We climbers pride ourselves on our lingo - it sets us apart from the rest of humanity and makes us feel good when we mystify regular folks with talk of "crash pads" and "toe hooks." (Both of these sound pretty weird when taken out of the context of climbing, eh?) But did you know there is a sub-language within our climberisms? There's the climbing term we use, and then what we actually meant. You might not even know you're doing this but believe me ... you're doin' it. I translated some common climberisms, and here's what I came up with:

Dab:

What it's supposed to mean:  You lightly brushed an off-route hold or object while climbing - depending on your ethics, this may invalidate a send.

What it REALLY means: Yeah ... you totally used that off hold. Like, not even just a little bit. We're talking like, fully-weighted it, but it was only ONCE and it started as an accident so the send TOTALLY still counts, right?

Send temps:

What it's supposed to mean: The ideal temperatures at which to climb, which can vary depending on the location, climate and rock type.

What it REALLY means: A temperature so perfect, you could send like, 2 grades harder if it ever occurred. Unfortunately for you, this temperature is more elusive than a unicorn, so you're stuck projecting things WAY below your limit.

Whipper:

What it's supposed to mean: A large, dynamic lead fall, where the rope is weighted significantly.

What it REALLY means: Any fall, really. Like top-rope, lead ... you can even whip off a boulder nowadays if you try hard enough. Whipper is a state of mind - if it felt big, it WAS big.

Crux:

What it's supposed to mean: The hardest sequence, or sequences of moves of a problem or route.

What it REALLY means: Any move you can't do.

Hangdog:

What it's supposed to mean: Working a route while taking and hanging on the draws.

What it REALLY means: Spending half your climbing session hanging at the same draw while brushing the same hold and saying "just one more try" like seven tries ago.

Futuristic:

What it's supposed to mean: New and innovative routesetting.

What it REALLY means: No holds. Only volumes.

Onsight:

What it's supposed to mean: Climbing a route on your first try, without any previous knowledge or beta for the route. 

What it REALLY means: When you send something after only watching someone do like, the first half. Or it was so long ago you don't remember any of the moves so it was basically an onsight.

Heel Hook:

What it's supposed to mean: A climbing move where you place your heel on a hold and weight it almost like you would a hand.

What it REALLY means: A move that looks cool when other people do it, but every time you try it you have to ask yourself "Am I doing this right?" and you know the answer is no because you don't know what you're doing. 

Choss:

What it's supposed to mean: Loose, poor quality rock.

What it REALLY means: Any route or area that sucks, regardless of rock quality.

Gaston:

What it's supposed to mean: A handhold grabbed with your thumb pointing down and elbow out.

What it REALLY means: A hold employed by routesetters when they hate you.

Undercling:

What it's supposed to mean: A hold with the usable surface on the underside, and is grabbed by pulling up instead of down.

What it REALLY means: A hold that just HAS to be a spinner.

Send:

What it's supposed to mean: To climb a route from bottom to top without falling, weighting any gear, or using anything considered "off."

What it REALLY means: You only fell like, one and a half times.

Volume:

What it's supposed to mean: A constructed feature that either can be used as a hand or foothold or can have additional holds bolted onto it. 

What it REALLY means: A death feature that will literally MURDER YOU TO DEATH when fallen on. THANKS AGAIN ROUTESETTERS.

Take:

What it's supposed to mean: A climbing command meant to express that you want excess rope in the belay system to be taken up.

What it REALLY means: Something yelled after you've already fallen off the wall.

Sandbag:

What it's supposed to mean: A route graded easier than what most of its previous climbers would generally agree with. 

What it REALLY means: Everything ever set. EVER.

There you have it! Feel free to tell me any I might have missed!

Bang for your buck - why TRX classes are just another benefit of being a member at Summit

Bang for your buck - why TRX classes are just another benefit of being a member at Summit

Here at Summit we pride ourselves in being more than just climbing gyms — we're yoga studios, workout spaces, and fitness class providers. We recently branched out our fitness classes to include TRX suspension training classes, and we're very excited to be expanding our TRX classes, with more class types and times. If you haven't tried one of our TRX classes, yet, here is a bit more about the classes, and their benefits for your climbing, and your overall fitness. 

The Luau was LIT: Results from our Spring Open competition

The Luau was LIT: Results from our Spring Open competition

Hey guys! Thanks to everyone who came out and made our Spring Open competition an absolute blast! Y'all certainly dressed the part - pretty sure we had more Hawaiian shirts and fake leis than Hawaii #guesstimate #quickmath. While uncooperative weather made some of our outdoor activities a little chilly (we had such high hopes for the dunk tank ...) hopefully the awesome food trucks and FREE BEER made up for it! A big congrats to the winner of our Buttermilk Sky-sponsored pie-eating contest — also sorry for how sick you probably felt later ... also not sorry. 

Are you ready to Luau?! It's our annual Spring Open Bouldering Competition next weekend!

Are you ready to Luau?! It's our annual Spring Open Bouldering Competition next weekend!

Our Spring Open Bouldering Competition is next Saturday, and we are getting SO. DANG. PSYCHED. Last year was our first-ever Spring Open, and our first competition to feature a block party in the middle of it. This year we're making it bigger and better, and wanted to share with y'all some of the great activities we have planned, so y'all come out and join us! PLUS- it's LUAU-themed, so get ready for leis, tacky shirts, drink umbrellas, and oddly-placed coconuts!

The League of Extraordinary Boulderers: Bouldering League starts soon, so what's the deal with that anyways?

The League of Extraordinary Boulderers: Bouldering League starts soon, so what's the deal with that anyways?

Looking for a place to compete with your friends? Looking for a place to compete AGAINST your friends? Looking for a place to make new friends? LOOK NO FURTHER -  Summit Bouldering League is ALL THESE THINGS and MORE aka the BEST TIME EVER. WHAT HAS BECOME OF MY CAPS LOCK?!